WWU students complete service project at Fulton Preschool

Katharine Carney, who plans to be a teacher, reads a Berenstain Bears book to the youngsters in Fulton Preschool.
Katharine Carney, who plans to be a teacher, reads a Berenstain Bears book to the youngsters in Fulton Preschool.

William Woods University students recently shared their knowledge of trees with the children of Fulton Preschool. This is thefifth yearmembers of

WWU’s Knowing the Woods student organization have completed a tree-related service project with the youngsters.

The project was coordinated this year by the organization’s co-president, Olivia Rush, a freshman from Phoenix, Arizona. She was assisted by Katharine Carney, a senior from St. Peters, Missouri; Shelby Cobb, a junior from Arcadia, California; and Sally Jo Kelley, a junior from Augusta, Missouri.

Katharine Carney reads a book to the Fulton Preschool children while Shelby Cobb (left) and Olivia Rush look on.
Katharine Carney reads a book to the Fulton Preschool children while Shelby Cobb (left) and Olivia Rush look on.

“We read a book, then helped them color Christmas trees for the nursing home,” Rush said. “We had so much fun and really enjoyed spending time with the kids. It was a nice break from the ‘big kid’ world.”

Sue Beaty, director of Fulton Preschool, was pleased with the interaction between the college students and the preschoolers.

“She (Rush) and her helpers did a nice job, and the children enjoyed their visit,” she said.

Other plans for the year include an Arbor Day celebration and tree planting on the WWU campus. The event is tentatively set for April 1, with

Members of Knowing the Woods (front to back) Shelby Cobb, Olivia Rush and Sally Jo Kelley help the youngsters draw Christmas trees.
Members of Knowing the Woods (front to back) Shelby Cobb, Olivia Rush and Sally Jo Kelley help the youngsters draw Christmas trees.

Angie Belden from the Conservation Department planning to attend.

The Arbor Day Foundation has proclaimed William Woods University a Tree Campus USA for four years in a row. In 2010, WWU was the first university in Missouri to achieve this status.

To obtain this distinction, WWU has met the five core standards for sustainable campus forestry required by Tree Campus USA, including establishment of a tree advisory committee, evidence of a campus tree-care plan, dedicated annual expenditures for its campus tree program, an Arbor Day observance and the sponsorship of student service-learning projects.