WWU Movie Goers Club Hosts Annual Film Festival

The Movie Goers Club on the William Woods University campus doesn’t just go to movies, they also show them. At 6 p.m. on Thursday, April 9, the club will show short films from around the world as they host their annual celebration, “Short Cuts: The WWU Film Festival.”

 


The film festival began five years ago, and the Movie Goers Club has played host for approximately three years.

 

According to Greg Smith, assistant professor of English and faculty sponsor for the event, the festival is held every year to promote awareness of the short film art form and to offer a forum for presentation of short films.

 

“The festival is held for educational purposes and is completely free: students are not charged admission, and filmmakers are not charged submission fees,” said Smith.

 

The films screened at the festival are chosen by faculty members on various aesthetic merits, such as cinematography, narrative style, acting, editing and sound design. The event is advertised on numerous international film festival websites, so submissions are received from around the world. This year, for example, the festival will highlight films from Spain and Mexico.

 


Along with the international films, the festival will also include films by Justin Beyer, a WWU student from Linn, Mo., and Murph Tetley, WWU instructor of management information systems. Beyer’s film is “Channel Surfer’s ‘Top 10 Greatest Movie Countdown.’” Tetley’s film is called, “Jackie, the Survivor,” the story of his dog that survived Parvo.

 

Also shown will be some Academy Award nominated films and some films by Pixar.

 

“We are showing a couple of Pixar shorts because Pixar is one of the leading studios currently producing computer animated shorts–in fact, many of Pixar’s hit movies are developed from shorts–and their short films are readily available on DVD,” Smith said. 

 

Smith stresses the fact that this event is first and foremost meant to be educational.

 

“This festival is designed as an educational endeavor that highlights the art of the short film in both its amateur and professional forms,” said Smith. “Ideally, the audience gains a greater appreciation for the art of the short film as a result of attending the festival.” 

 

The festival, to be held in the Library Auditorium, is free, but limited to 50 viewers in the interest of both comfort and space. For more information on the festival, contact Smith at (573) 592-4399 or greg.smith@williamwoods.edu.