WWU equestrian team shows at 2015 Pinto World Championships

A William Woods University student and the equestrian studies division chair both earned Reserve

Jennie Petterson and Tarbask Desert Indian (Scout)
Jennie Petterson and Tarbask Desert Indian (Scout)

World Championships at the 2015 Pinto World Championships.

The Pinto World Championships is one of the largest single breed horse shows in the country, with upwards of 8,000 entries and hundreds of events. The 13-day event ran June 8-20 at the Built Ford Tough Livestock Complex in Tulsa, Oklahoma.

The division chair, Jennie Petterson, and Tarbask Desert Indian (Scout) earned a Reserve World Championship in Open Tobiano Geldings.

Josey Metoxen and Balido KA
Josey Metoxen and Balido KA

Josey Metoxen, of Oneida, Wisconsin, rode Balido KA to claim Reserve World Champion in Amateur English Disciplined Rail. Metoxen, who will be a junior in the fall, also won three Top 5 awards and five Top 10.

“She rode the class with confidence and determination and it really paid off,” said Petterson.

In addition to Petterson and Metoxen, students Grace Routh of Maryland Heights, Missouri, and Patti Finch of Berryville, Arkansas, competed in such classes as western, hunt, halter and showmanship.

“This is such a great show and opportunity for students to compete at the national level,” Petterson said. “Pinto is very student-friendly and from the stalling office, the show office to the paddock master you know that they are there to support you.”

She added, “William Woods University has a long history of attending the Pinto World Championships with William Woods University-owned horses. The Pinto Horse Association of America organizes a wonderful competition with top quality judges and officials and fabulous prizes and awards.”

Routh, who will be a senior, and William Woods-owned WV Kyss of Fame (Rudy) earned a third place

Grace Routh and WV Kyss of Fame (Rudy)
Grace Routh and WV Kyss of Fame (Rudy)

and seven top 10 awards, showing in hunt, western and halter classes.

“Grace learned so much about exhibiting a pleasure type horse, and did a brilliant job showing him to a third in the Amateur Halter Gelding class,” Petterson said. “That was truly one of the highlights of the show for me.”

“You learn a lot of things about yourself while you are at a horse show that is two weeks long,” Routh said. “It’s demanding, hot, long days and nights, but in the end I still got to look back at my experience and realized this really is something I want to do with the rest of my life. Without the opportunity with William Woods I would probably never be able to show a horse of that quality at that level of show, and I am extremely thankful for that!”

Patti Finch and Lonestar’s Zipsational (Zipper)
Patti Finch and Lonestar’s Zipsational (Zipper)

Finch, who is entering her junior year, rode Lonestar’s Zipsational (Zipper, owned by faculty member Liz Haben) in his world show debut in trail on a very tough course. She made the judge’s card, but not the overall placing.

“Patti was in a tough division with Zipper. She faced splits in all of her classes and two very challenging trail classes. A world championship level trail course is incredibly challenging and the event is new for Zipper,” Petterson said.

“Although she ended up on only one judge’s card, she flawlessly negotiated one of the toughest obstacles on the course. In a two-split field in the Novice Amateur Western Disciplined Rail, she not only made the final with a strong ride in the first split, but ended up eighth overall in a very competitive field. It was tears of joy all the way around for that eighth place. She had to beat so many amazing horses to earn that top 10 placing.”

Petterson exhibited three different horses in the open division: Tarbask Desert Indian, Balido KA and

Jennie Petterson and Balido KA
Jennie Petterson and Balido KA

WV Kyss of Fame, receiving ribbons with all three horses.

“Competing against horses of the quality and caliber that attend this show is a privilege,” Petterson said. “Our WWU horses were competitive and more importantly, we were all able to demonstrate the attention to detail, dedication and sportsmanship that our faculty and students are known for. It’s a joy to show and I am grateful for the opportunity to present WWU-owned horses at this level.”

William Woods University has offered an equestrian program since 1924, and in 1972 was the first university in the United States to offer a four-year degree in equestrian science. WWU has since added bachelor-degree programs in equine administration and equine general studies, as well as an online Master of Education degree in equestrian education. The university established a Center for Equine Medicine on newly acquired property this summer.