WWU Adopts eMINTS Certification Program to Enhance Learning

A new program at William Woods University aims to provide education majors with needed technological expertise. The program is called eMINTS (enhancing Missouri’s Instructional Networked Teaching Strategies) Certification.

 

The eMINTS program seeks “to prepare our future educators to use technology more effectively and to integrate the most effective teaching strategies into teaching,” Dr. Roger Wen, associate professor of education, said.

 

“William Woods has long been known for innovative programs,” Dr. Sherry McCarthy, WWU vice president and academic dean, said. “eMINTS utilizes technology in classroom teaching the way it should be done—to engage students and enhance learning,”

 

Wen believes the program will prepare education students to achieve at a higher level, and certification will make them more marketable when they graduate.

“With the certification in hand, WWU graduates will be prepared to be the next generation of educators, and the students they teach will learn at a different level,” he said.

The eMINTS National Center offers professional development programs created by educators for educators. The center produces programs that inspire educators to use instructional strategies powered by technology, engage students in the excitement of learning and enrich teaching to dramatically improve student performance.

 

“Having the eMINTS certification available to our education students fits our mission in preparing our students to live in a global society where educators will use information and resources from around the world in their classrooms” McCarthy said.

                                                                      

“No longer is knowledge and information limited by the classroom teacher’s background or the district’s resources. The teacher is becoming a facilitator for information and knowledge from sources in other schools districts, other states and other countries.”  

 

The path to becoming an eMINTS teacher includes completing the eMINTS comprehensive professional development program as a pre-service teacher, student teaching in an approved eMINTS classroom (additional credit hours) and successful portfolio completion.

 

The eMINTS program now serves students in more than 4,500 classrooms in Missouri and eight other states (Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Illinois, Maryland, New Jersey, Nevada and Utah), as well as in New South Wales, Australia. It is available for all subject areas and adaptable to all grade levels, K-12.

 

The program at WWU will start with elementary education majors and certification is expected to be available by 2014.  

 

“The instructors first have to be trained in the eMints methods and must completely redevelop courses around the eMints philosophy of technology in education,” McCarthy explained.