There’s a Skeleton in the Attic… A Horse Skeleton, That is

Have you ever wondered what happened to that famous horse you read about in your history book or saw on the silver screen?

 


ComancheFor instance, what about Traveller, favored mount of General Robert E. Lee in the Civil War, or Comanche, the sole survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn? Whatever happened to Trigger, the beautiful sidekick of Roy Rogers?

 

The answer may surprise you. Laura Ward, assistant professor of equestrian science at William Woods University, will talk about some of the famous horse skeletons in museums across the country. 

 

This event will take place at 7 p.m. Tuesday, Nov. 10, in WWU’s Library Auditorium. It is free and open to any members of the public who are interested in learning some little-known historical horse trivia.

 

Many of these skeletons Ward will discuss are on display at museums such as the Smithsonian Institution and the American Museum of Natural History in New York.

 

Some of the famous horses included in the presentation are Lexington, aSysonby famous racehorse from the 1870s; Winchester, the Civil War mount of  General Sheridan, and Sysonby, another famous racehorse who died young and whose body was donated for the study of anatomy and locomotion.                                                           

 

“The horse is so significant in history, and these are horses whose names we knew. They aren’t just fossils. These are actual individual horses that did something critical in our nation’s history. That’s just amazing to consider,” said Ward.

                                                             

 

CUTLINES:

Sysonby, a famous racehorse whose body was donated for the study of anatomy and locomotion

 

Comanche, the sole survivor of the Battle of Little Bighorn