Exercise Program at WWU Again Recognized by National Organization

logoThe exercise science program at William Woods University has once again been officially recognized by the National Strength and Conditioning Association (NSCA).

The program, which was established at WWU in 2004, has been officially recognized continuously since 2006. Recognition is good for three years, and this is the fourth time WWU has met the criteria recommended for official recognition.

“Congratulations on this achievement. The NSCA thanks you for your participation and contribution to the NSCA Education Recognition Program,” Linda L. Aaberg, NSCA administrative coordinator, said.

“For more than 35 years, the NSCA has been the leader in building stronger professionals within the strength and conditioning industry. We look forward to round logopartnering with you in support of helping your students take the key steps towards reaching their career goals.

Dr. Aimee Sapp, WWU vice president and dean of academic affairs, was pleased with the NSCA honor, explaining, “It is recognition of a quality program.”

As a result of this recognition, students will receive career planning information and discounts on their certification examinations. In addition, WWU may use a recognition statement on forms, documents and recruiting materials. The program will be listed on the NSCA website and in NSCA publications.

Zach McDearmon makes use of some of WWU’s exercise equipment while Abby Stock-Timmerberg supervises.
Zach McDearmon makes use of some of WWU’s exercise equipment while Abby Stock-Timmerberg supervises.

Exercise science was added as a fourth major within the division of human performance in the fall of 2004. The division, which was founded in 2002, also includes athletic training, sports management and physical education.

The exercise science program at William Woods is housed in the $1.3 million Center for Human Performance, which includes state-of-the-art equipment in exercise testing and rehabilitation.

Designed to give students the necessary academic preparation and practical experience to serve as fitness and exercise specialists, exercise science courses include exercise physiology, biomechanics, fitness/wellness assessment and exercise leadership and programming.

Cindy Robb, assistant professor, is in charge of the exercise science program. Marshall Robb and Bob Jones are adjunct faculty and both are certified by NSCA as Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialists. Jones also is the strength and conditioning coach for the WWU athletic department.

“Exercise Science is a rigorous academic program that includes the study of kinesiology, exercise physiology, strength and conditioning and program design,” Cindy Robb said.  “The program prepares students to work in fitness and wellness facilities, running the gamut from people wanting to start an exercise program to those in professional sports.”

The growth of fitness, sports and wellness programs continues to create a need for well-trained professionals able to handle multiple roles in organizations, she explained.

Quinton Sallin takes notes during a NSCA workshop in February at William Woods University in preparation for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist test. A May 2015 WWU graduate, Sallin recently was certified.
Quinton Sallin takes notes during a NSCA workshop in February at William Woods University in preparation for the Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist test. A May 2015 WWU graduate, Sallin recently was certified.

“To meet these challenging roles, one must be trained to think critically, communicate effectively, work well as a team member, utilize the latest in technologies and demonstrate competency. WWU’s exercise science program offers just that,” Cindy Robb said.

Last February, the National Strength and Conditioning Association honored William Woods by selecting the university to host a special workshop to prepare participants for its Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist test.