Black History Month Events Added at WWU

In conjunction with Black History Month, William Woods University is hosting a number of events. All are free and open to the public.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 16, 4:30 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Multicultural Affairs Club’s Black History Month Film Series: “The Color Purple” –a 1985 film based on the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel by Alice Walker. Filmed in North Carolina, it tells the story of a young African-American girl named Celie and shows the problems African-American women faced during the early 1900s, including poverty, racism, and sexism. The character Celie is transformed as she finds her self-worth through the help of two strong female companions. Discussion prior to the film.

 


Thursday, Feb. 17, 3 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Movie: “Crash” – several stories dealing with race interweave during two days in Los Angeles involving a collection of inter-related characters. A discussion will be conducted on how we, as people, are all connected.

 

Friday, Feb. 18, 3 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Multicultural Affairs Club’s Black History Month Film Series: “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner “- This 1967 film, starring Spencer Tracy, Sidney Poitier and Katharine Hepburn, was groundbreaking for its positive representation of the controversial subject of interracial marriage, which was still illegal in 17 southern states up until June 12 of the year of the film’s release. Discussion will be held prior to the film.

 

Monday, Feb. 21, 3 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Stephen Hageman 

African-American History Month – The 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry – To commemorate both African-American History Month and the 150th Anniversary of the beginning of the American Civil War, a documentary that tells the story of the 54th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry, the first all-African American regiment in the Civil War, will be shown and discussed.

 

Tuesday, Feb. 22, 2011, 3:30 p.m. Burton 100

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Presentation: Why Can’t We All Just Get Along? – The push for diversification is an ongoing pursuit of many U.S. campuses. Despite this push for inclusion, many students continue to segregate themselves from other ethnically different groups. Why is that? We will discuss this issue of the importance of ethnic inclusion and what can be done to embrace this concept on our campus. 

 

Wednesday, Feb. 23, and Thursday, Feb. 24, noon, Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Laura Ward

Bringing to Light Black Horsemen in Saddlebred History – Many contributions have been made by African-Americans in the American Saddlebred industry, and the Saddlebred is one of the oldest breeds in the United States. From the days following the Civil War through the 1970s, black horsemen played an important, yet often unrecognized, role as caretakers, trainers and owners of this fine breed. Forced by social stigma of the times to take a backseat to their white peers, they persevered nevertheless. The work they did behind the scenes put many horses into the winner’s circle on both national and world championship levels for white exhibitors. Not until the late ‘70s were these men able to claim those victories and more for themselves.

 

Wednesday, Feb. 23, 4:30 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Multicultural Affairs Club’s Black History Month Film Series: “To Kill a Mockingbird” – Based on the groundbreaking novel by Harper Lee, this 1963 film won three Oscars including best actor for Gregory Peck’s portrayal of Atticus Finch. Discussion will be held prior to the film.

 

Thursday, Feb. 24, 4 p.m., Library Auditorium

Sponsored by Tammy Carter

Movie: “A Time To Kill” – This movie tells of a young lawyer who de